Posts

cals/hr

The Brief Story of Thought Field Therapy (TFT) And Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

About three years ago, I received a phone call from Fuller Royal, MD director of a medical clinic in Las Vegas. He called to tell me that the treatments I developed were helping his patients. He told me that he used Heart Rate Variability (HRV), an objective test, unresponsive to placebo, in order to test all his treatments. He said that he never has seen a more powerful means of improving HRV.

A short while later, I was contacted by an expert on HRV, he told me that he was using HRV to measure the effectiveness of various treatments to reduce anger.

When he tried my treatment for chronic anger, he saw a dramatic improvement in the patient and also a dramatic improvement in the HRV score. (It is well known that chronic anger can be a serious problem for heart patients.)

Still later, I heard from a practitioner in Norway who manufactures HRV equipment and the results he obtained from using my treatments had such a powerful effect on his HRV equipment that at first he thought something went wrong with the equipment for he had never before seen such changes in HRV. He found it was the power of my treatments and his equipment was fine.

The term Heart Rate Variability refers to a precise measure in milliseconds in the variation in the intervals between heart beats. Over 40 years ago, it was found that when the interval between heart beats becomes smaller then death follows. Read more

Tapping for dogs

In a successful experience with TFT, I was retained to work with a Jack Russell Terrier who was dismissed from the Conformation Ring for growling at the judge and biting him when he examined the dog’s feet.

Could TFT cure this problem? I wondered.

After some basic obedience training using positive reinforcement, I found the pup only 80% reliable. By using TFT, I was able to break through that final 20% and he went on to earn his Championship.

I started with desensitizing handling, then had strangers handle his feet while he was on a table. When he growled at them and showed his teeth to the handler, I started TFT.

At first, the pup was not receptive to the tapping. That is to say, he resisted it. I started by tapping him in the middle of his forehead, a technique I have used for many years (prior to my knowledge of TFT) to calm hyperactive dogs. After getting his attention, I used the eyebrow, under eye, under arm, clavicle, and gamut tapping sequence.

At first he looked surprised, and then calm.

After several treatments, the pup seemed to invite the tapping as though aware it was making him feel better.

I’ve also used TFT with other dogs including, recently, two Labrador Retrievers who were rescued from very abusive homes. Both dogs were fear-aggressive, lunging, barking, snapping, then retreating. After working with the dogs for several days, gaining their confidence, I had a stranger approach the dogs to maximize their trauma. I then applied the treatment, tapping the forehead, under eye, clavicle and sternum. The dogs calmed noticeably.

I have also used TFT many times briefly when working with students in classes. As I approach the pups, I signal them with the calming signals and then tap them on the forehead, under the eye, and on the sternum or clavicle, whichever is easiest to find. The only times I do not feel successful are when the owners interfere with or are not willing to try the treatment.

I believe TFT works when the dog is confident in the person applying the treatment. It should not be tried with a dog who is frightened of everyone and who has no “ally” in the room. In this situation, I find that dogs are not receptive to treatment and it is very difficult to tap the appropriate spots. —Lee Wells

Tft and babies

Settling in for the 16-hour flight on my way home from presenting at the Pacific Rim Energy Conference, I had an amusing experience. The huge airliner was filled to capacity, and several families were traveling with infants on board.

When I requested a bulkhead seat so I could stretch out my legs, I had no idea that—during long flights—this section was also used to hang baby beds off the bulkhead.  As a result, I found myself surrounded by infants including an adorable baby boy and his family traveling next to me.

Before the flight, I had noticed the parents in the lobby—playing with their happy infant, while awaiting boarding instructions.  Unfortunately, by the time we boarded, it was 9:30 p.m. and the babies were already tired and stressed. Of course, when the airplane took off, the crying began.

I expected that.

Yet when the plane leveled off, the cries simply escalated. Mothers and fathers took turns walking their babies around. Nothing worked.

Hoping to help, I turned to my seat mates and told them I thought I could calm their infant.  Of course, they didn’t believe me. So I went on to explain I had just come from Singapore, where I was teaching energy therapy, and that I was pretty sure it would work on their son.

By this time, they were willing to try anything (and so, I imagine, were the passengers). Tapping on myself to illustrate, I showed them how to tap out the simple anxiety algorithm (eye, arm, collarbone). They did it twice and the baby calmed down immediately. In fact, he was asleep within minutes. Placed in his hanging bed, he slept almost 12 hours.  And when he awakened, he remained calm for the rest of the flight.

Another parent had been watching and asked me to show him the same tapping sequence. I treated yet another infant with the same result.  Mission accomplished.

Peace was restored —Susan Wright