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These are the same procedures given in the Daily Stress Busting Program, where you will see exactly how and where to apply them to yourself, for the stress of everything from job interviews to exam anxiety to travel fears.

Today’s world is chaotic, filled with anxiety, trauma and stress, from natural disasters, war, terrorists and the economic crises of job loss, home foreclosures and stock market crashes.

This constant stress on our minds and bodies takes its toll. Studies continually tell us stress depresses our immune system, increases risk of heart disease, aggravates weight and addictive behaviors and leads to sleep problems. Not to speak of what it does to us emotionally.

To get emotional freedom, you need to first get free of stress. Most of us find these stresses inescapable, but, there is something you can do, quickly and simply, to reduce the stress on your system.

Dr. Roger Callahan’s Thought Field Therapy® has over 30 years of success in conquering trauma, stress, phobias, fears and addictions. It has some proven yet simple, self-help procedures (based on the body’s meridian system) that will decrease the stress we experience daily.

These protocols are explained, in detail, in Dr. Roger Callahan’s book, Tapping the Healer Within, and key procedures for reducing stress are provided in his Daily Stress Busting Program.

This simple, Daily Stress Busting Program, based on procedures from his book Tapping the Healer Within, and proven in relief work in areas such as Kosovo, Rwanda, New Orleans, can offer you significant relief in your hectic, unpredictable world. Find the emotional freedom you need.

You can get the free tapping guide at http://www.RogerCallahan.com

stress-cancer-trauma - TFT

Last week we did an introductory level tele-class, Though Field Therapy, Stress, Trauma and Cancer, where we outlined some of the many ways TFT can help people who have cancer. The recording is available to listen to here.

If you tuned into this meeting, you will recall how we found that our treatment for trauma can be of great help in two major ways. It was Dr. Ryke Geerd Hamer, a German oncologist, who developed cancer after he suddenly lost his son in an automobile accident. Although many professionals attribute the origin of numerous problems to past traumas, Dr. Hamer, I believe, is quite correct in this theory that such a trauma can start and nurture the beginning of cancer due to the amount of stress that can suddenly and unexpectedly submerge a person. This theory is further supported in a book by Lothar Herneise. (Herneise, Lothar 2005 Chemotherapy heals cancer and the world is flat. Sensei Verlag Kernen/Germany).

Fortunately, I discovered and know exactly how to reduce and even eliminate every trace of such horrible intense stress.

Our recent teleclass on Tapping the Healer Within, tells us the many, many ways stress negatively effects our well being and emotional health. (By the way, I am aware that the usual method of reducing stress is a combination of breathing deeply and progressively relaxing the tension in the muscles. I found this method to be possible, but not reliable, for it is too difficult to do to the degree to which it is needed to help a human.)

I have found that the trauma treatments I developed can eliminate not only a trauma that may have been causal in the development of a disease but also on the now current trauma of being diagnosed with cancer.

I personally know the importance of successfully treating and eliminating the trauma from a diagnosis of cancer. I have had that diagnosis and so has my wife. We are both cancer free and regularly address the stress and trauma in our lives, in order to prevent it’s return.

Listen in on our teleseminar recording to find out more.

Dr. Callahan, TFT’s Founder and Developer, and Joanne Callahan, MBA, share 16 ways to help cancer patients. Both Dr. Callahan and Joanne are cancer survivors, familiar with the traumas, fears and challenges of someone suffering from cancer.  You can find out more about this one-hour teleclass on Cancer and Thought Field Therapy® here.

An interesting article on stress and it’s effects from Germany:

Constant stress at work is bad for heart

Aliki Nassoufis, dpa, Hamburg, Germany
The Denver Post

Work is piling up on the desk and in a few hours the presentation must be finished. To make matters worse, the telephone keeps ringing. Job-related stress is common. If it goes on for years, though, it can have serious physical consequences — particularly for the heart.

According to the German Heart Foundation, each year nearly 300,000 people in Germany suffer a a heart attack, often due to stress. So reducing stress at the workplace can be an important means of preventing serious heart disease.

“Stress causes, among other things, the release of more stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol into the bloodstream,” explained Ulrich Hildebrandt, head physician in the Cardiology Department at St Irmingard Clinic.

This reaction, he said, was sometimes vital to our forebears: “When in danger, the body went into maximum gear and into a state of emergency to survive critical situations, for example by fleeing from a large animal.”

Stress also ramps up the autonomic nervous system, which “regulates how often the heart beats and how many times a minute it contracts, among other things,” Hildebrandt said. These stress reactions, if persistent or regular, can cause damage to the body.

“Someone suffering from chronic stress is always steamed up, so to speak,” remarked Karl-Heinz Ladwig, a member of the German Heart Foundation’s scientific advisory board. “This means, for example, that the heart rate is constantly elevated and the heart beats more frequently than in its normal state.”

More strain is put on the heart, he said, resulting in more damage. The regular release of stress hormones into the bloodstream can also lead to high blood pressure and irritable bowel syndrome.

“Another aspect is that the psyche can affect the body’s immune system,” Ladwig pointed out. In other words, a person under constant stress gets infections more often and tends to heal from wounds more slowly.

“Work-related stress is a combination of objective and subjective parameters,” he said. Though studies have shown that objective stress factors such as time pressure, constant noise, lots of overtime and a heavy workload considerably increase the risk of heart disease, Ladwig said, “how you react to these objective factors and whether you can try to change them also plays a role.”

Still, the causes of stress are more objective in nature than mental, he noted. But they need not lead to a heart attack or other forms of heart disease.

“You can try to reduce the stress somewhat,” advised Jochen Jordan, a psychocardiologist and member of the German Cardiac Society.

People who are always setting themselves higher goals and putting themselves under pressure are heightening stress, he remarked. “Instead,” he said, “you should ask yourself, ‘Is this work style worth it? Is this the way I want to live?'”

Those who put less stress on themselves are taking care of their cardiovascular system. Read more

This article provides great support for those mental health practitioners who have and are helping cancer patients.

HELPING PATIENTS WITH CANCER, by Richard E. Gill, Assistant Editor, The American Psychologist [emphases are added by me, RJC.]

When we returned from Honolulu our mail was waiting for us. On the top of the pile was a newspaper THE AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGIST. The headline read, “Breast Cancer Survival Rates improve with psychological intervention.”

The story continued:

“IN WHAT COULD BE A MAJOR STEP IN THE BATTLE AGAINST BREAST CANCER, an 11 year study by Ohio State University’s Department of Psychology shows that psychological intervention may very well improve a woman/s survival rate.

The study showed that breast cancer victims might have a better chance of survival, said Barbara Anderson, PhD, professor of psychology, if they join a quality psychological intervention group conducted by an experienced therapist.

Of the 227 women who joined in the study, 114 received psychological intervention programs, while 113 received assessment only, Anderson said. “Findings of the study established that patients receiving the intervention had less than half the risk of death from breast cancer compared to those who did not receive intervention and had a reduced risk of death from all causes, not just cancer.”

Published in the December issue of Cancer, the peer–reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that reducing stress that can accompany cancer diagnosis and treatment can have a significant impact on patients’ survival.

Anderson said the findings could have a major impact on the study of breast cancer, “…we certainly hope it has a major impact. We worked really hard to find a study to answer the question: Can psychological intervention reduce the risk for re-occurrence of breast cancer and death? We are confident our findings are real.”

In the near future I will comment in detail on the possible intriguing meanings of this curious comment from this brilliant clinical researcher.

Many researchers have theorized that providing mental health services in addition to cancer care may improve a patient’s health and even prolong their survival but studies linking psychotherapy to improved survival have had inconsistent results. According to Anderson, this study is another step in helping breast cancer victims live longer. “That’s exactly what we found,” she added.

BREAST CANCER SURVIVAL RATES IMPROVE WITH PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTION [headline on page 2 of National Psychologist]

Interventions included strategies to reduce stress and enhance their relationship with friends and family coping effectively improving mood, offering health behavior, especially with diets, and maintaining adherence to cancer treatment and care. Anderson said the study was weak in the area of exercise, but she is confident that exercise plays a significant role in overall health.

Just as important, the study had a significant impact on immune enhancement. Effects of this study concerning immunity were very robust, she said. A large sample of cancer victims who came into the study had high levels of stress that were related to lower levels of immunity.

We know that in those who joined interventions their immunity went up. We’re not guessing, we know that intervention affected immunity, she said. The interventions had a very powerful psychological effect and very powerful behavioral effects. It’s clear that they had health benefits… and survival benefits.”

Said Anderson, “Interventions may impact immune changes that are secondary to stress hormones that may promote cancer growth or metastasis and that in addition to treating cancer patients with powerful anti-tumor medications it also important to treat psychological distress as well.”

The American Cancer Society says there are in excess of 100,000 potential breast cancer victims in this country. Anderson hopes the results of this pragmatic study will persuade psychologists to start cancer patients intervention groups around the country.

“If efficacious psychological interventions to reduce stress are delivered early they will improve mental health and treatment relevant behavior and potentially, biologic outcomes,” Anderson said.