I Just Tapped and Walked Away

Thought Field Therapy and Bullying

By Dr. Victoria Yancey, TFT, Dx, United States

“You are fat, stupid and ugly.” This is just one example of the taunting that some students endure from peers and classmates.

These and other harmful statements are instances of bullying. Bullying is a form of violence. It is negative, aggressive and unwanted behaviors to cause harm, hurt or humiliation. It is anything that hurts another person, when things are repeatedly said or done to have power over that individual.

There are many types of bullying. There is racial bullying, sexual bullying and cyber-bullying. Bullying includes name calling, saying or writing derogatory comments, purposely excluding an individual from activities, spreading lies and rumors, ignoring, threatening, doing anything to make another person feel uncomfortable or scared, stealing or damaging belongings of others, kicking, hitting, slapping, making someone do things they do not want to do.

When Thought Field Therapy (TFT) was taught to a group of students they reported using TFT when confronted with the violence of being picked on or bullied.

Children handle being bullied in many different ways. Those who are bullied are subject to peer pressure. Sometimes they end up doing something they really do not want to do in order to “fit in” hoping that the bullying will stop.

Those who are bullied often feel pain, fear or hurt. They lose self-confidence and feel lonely, scared and sad. They sometimes do not feel safe at school, home or at play and often have poor grades in school. They may suffer from depression, headaches, stomach aches and other health problems, and they may also have thoughts of suicide. Some feel it necessary to fight or bring a gun or weapon to school to stop the hurt of being bullied.

I worked with a group of middle school students who felt they where being bullied. The students where referred to me by their parents because they where getting into trouble in school. Many of the students were receiving declining or failing grades. Some of the students had either experienced detentions or suspensions, in or outside of school, for fighting. Read more

TFT Demonstrations in Sign Language

The principles and brief history behind Thought Field Therapy – TFT.

Narrated in American Sign Language. Narrated by Doris Millios.

In our effort to provide free trauma relief throughout the world, we now have our trauma algorithm available in sign language.  It will be posted on our trauma relief blog, along with the videos and print instructions in many languages.  It is Dr. Callahan’s goal, along with the ATFT Foundation, to provide free trauma relief to as many as possible in the world.

Collarbone Breathing Technique with Thought Field Therapy.

How to Overcome Pain and Depression With Thought Field Therapy.

Trauma and Advanced Trauma Techniques in Thought Field Therapy.

Stress and Your Heart

An interesting article on stress and it’s effects from Germany:

Constant stress at work is bad for heart

Aliki Nassoufis, dpa, Hamburg, Germany
The Denver Post

Work is piling up on the desk and in a few hours the presentation must be finished. To make matters worse, the telephone keeps ringing. Job-related stress is common. If it goes on for years, though, it can have serious physical consequences — particularly for the heart.

According to the German Heart Foundation, each year nearly 300,000 people in Germany suffer a a heart attack, often due to stress. So reducing stress at the workplace can be an important means of preventing serious heart disease.

“Stress causes, among other things, the release of more stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol into the bloodstream,” explained Ulrich Hildebrandt, head physician in the Cardiology Department at St Irmingard Clinic.

This reaction, he said, was sometimes vital to our forebears: “When in danger, the body went into maximum gear and into a state of emergency to survive critical situations, for example by fleeing from a large animal.”

Stress also ramps up the autonomic nervous system, which “regulates how often the heart beats and how many times a minute it contracts, among other things,” Hildebrandt said. These stress reactions, if persistent or regular, can cause damage to the body.

“Someone suffering from chronic stress is always steamed up, so to speak,” remarked Karl-Heinz Ladwig, a member of the German Heart Foundation’s scientific advisory board. “This means, for example, that the heart rate is constantly elevated and the heart beats more frequently than in its normal state.”

More strain is put on the heart, he said, resulting in more damage. The regular release of stress hormones into the bloodstream can also lead to high blood pressure and irritable bowel syndrome.

“Another aspect is that the psyche can affect the body’s immune system,” Ladwig pointed out. In other words, a person under constant stress gets infections more often and tends to heal from wounds more slowly.

“Work-related stress is a combination of objective and subjective parameters,” he said. Though studies have shown that objective stress factors such as time pressure, constant noise, lots of overtime and a heavy workload considerably increase the risk of heart disease, Ladwig said, “how you react to these objective factors and whether you can try to change them also plays a role.”

Still, the causes of stress are more objective in nature than mental, he noted. But they need not lead to a heart attack or other forms of heart disease.

“You can try to reduce the stress somewhat,” advised Jochen Jordan, a psychocardiologist and member of the German Cardiac Society.

People who are always setting themselves higher goals and putting themselves under pressure are heightening stress, he remarked. “Instead,” he said, “you should ask yourself, ‘Is this work style worth it? Is this the way I want to live?'”

Those who put less stress on themselves are taking care of their cardiovascular system. Read more